For the love of it Pt 3 - the final chapter

February 13, 2013  •  5 Comments

For those of you who haven't read parts one and two, please read them first so you can appreciate the whole story. You can find them at the following links

http://www.barbaraleatham.co.uk/blog/2013/1/for-the-love-of-valentines

http://www.barbaraleatham.co.uk/blog/2013/2/for-the-love-of-it-pt-2

 

Elinor called me on Friday with the exciting news that the sliver work had come back from the hall markers; could I pop over to shoot the final part of the story so she could have the piece ready for Valentines?
It felt providential as this was a story about love. The love of a jeweller; the reinvention of a loved piece of jewellery, and my love as a photographer, feeling that photographic stories can say more than my simple words. Getting this all ready for Valentines, a day devoted to love.

 

 

It was agreed that Elinor would set three of the most difficult stones. It was important that she concentrated on them to ensure they were set without problems, and as small as I am, hovering with a lens can be added pressure that delicate work doesn't need. So when I arrived I found Elinor prepping to set the final stones.

 

It was the little things that caught my eye. The fact the clamp had specific places where Elinor put it for different needs during the process. The use of a hair dryer (and I thought this was the sole area of hair dressers and photographers...) The use of blue-tack to help position and reposition the stones. All of these things showed the love this lady has for her work.

Elinor puts the silver piece on to what looks like grey plasticine, but is in fact called "Thermo Loc" or the common name is called "setters cement".
The hair dryer is used to soften it enough to allow the pendant to be held so that the stones can be added and set in place.

 


Using much loved and well worn tools, such as this Bezel Pusher, she begins to secure the stones into place. Attention to detail doesn't come close to the care that Elinor shows when she's doing this work 

 


This mushroom shaped tool, a Bezel Roller, continues the setting, bending the silver over tighter to hold the stones in their mounts. There's a sense of things really coming together with every tiny little tap of the hammer.

 


I smiled when Elinor told me that one of her specialist pieces of equipment is a piece of a tooth brush. Part of the experience that a jeweller picks up is the knowledge that some stones are so big, or fragile, or both, that the normal commercial tools means there's an increased risk of danger of damaging the stones. It is assumed that a jeweller will find their own "specialist" tools that are suited to specific jobs. I have to say, it worked a treat and seemed a reasonably natural choice. After an intense period of tapping the stones are secure and you can see that the piece is going to look stunning. It is this attention to detail that separates Elinor from her peers.

 

Once the stones are set you can see that the edges need to be smoothed. Traditionally a jeweller uses a horn shaped tool called a Burnisher. With small repetitive movements, the sliver is smoothed and finished to a high quality. This is a hugely time consuming way to finish a very intricate piece of jewellery, so Elinor chooses to use her years of experience to finish the piece using more up to date methods.

 

We talked at length about the decision to use the polishing wheels. She tells me that it would only be with years of experience that she would ever consider this as an option to finish a piece. it is a true reflection of her skills that she finishes this piece in this method and it looks stunning.

 


Putting the final polish on the piece, it's almost ready for the client.

 

Isn't it stunning.

 


From these simple pieces of raw silver, through the design skills of this very talented young lady, to the final piece, this really has been a truly inspiring journey to capture.

 

 

If you want to see more of Elinor Cambray's work, please go along to her website

www.elinorcambray.com

Or you can visit her at Fisherton Mill, 108 Fisherton Street, Salisbury, SP2 7QY

 
I would like to take this opportunity to give my sincere thanks to Elinor, for her time, her patience, and for allowing me the chance to cover this amazing story. It's very hard to walk out of her work space and not feel the desire to own something she has created. Her work is amazing, inspiring and just simply beautiful.
 
 

 

 

 


Comments

5.Jane(non-registered)
Really excited to see the final part and wasn't disappointed, how beautiful and how amazing to own such a Bespoke piece of jewellery, from beginning to end it is unique and beautifully crafted. A real insight into both Elinor's talent and yours.
4.Janet(non-registered)
Wonderful story brought to life with your amazing images, and what a beautiful piece of jewellry at the end x
3.Alexandra Davies(non-registered)
What an absolutely stunning piece of jewellery. I've so enjoyed seeing the story from beginning to end with the aid of your wonderful photographs :) x
2.Jo(non-registered)
Great series of images and posts. Loved the 'from this to this' at the end, which makes you realise how skilled Elinor is.
1.Michelle(non-registered)
And Happy Valentines Day to you too. The final image is breathtaking and highly inspiring . Now all we need to know is who the lucky lady is who gets it...
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